Call Device Function
Your Photon device app can share a custom function through Particle Cloud, so your web app can call the function to make it run on your Photon device.
For example, your Photon device app could share a custom function that toggles an LED light on or off, so your web app would be able to call this function to remotely turn the light on or off.
Your Photon device app will use the Particle.function() method to share a custom function through Particle Cloud.
A "cloud function" will be created that acts like a reference to the custom function in your device app.
Your web app will use the particle.callFunction() method to make the custom function run on your Photon device by calling its cloud function reference.

Photon Device App

Your Photon device app will use the Particle.function() method to share a custom function through Particle Cloud by creating a cloud function. In addition, you will also need to modify the custom function to work with Particle Cloud.

Share Device Function

Add this code statement (be sure to modify) within the setup() function of your Photon app:
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Particle.function("cloudFunc", deviceFunc);
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The Particle.function() method requires two parameters inside its parentheses (in this order):
  1. 1.
    The cloud function name, which can be up to 12 characters in length. If possible (for simplicity), make your cloud function name match your device function name. However, the cloud function is allowed to have a different name. The cloud function name must be listed within double quotation marks without parentheses after its name. Change "cloudFunc" to the actual name that you want to use for the cloud function.
  2. 2.
    The Photon device function name, which is the custom function in your Photon device app that will be shared through Particle Cloud. List the function name without parentheses after its name. Change deviceFunc to the actual name of the custom function in your Photon device app that you want to share.
Particle Cloud will let your Photon device share up to 15 cloud functions at one time. Each of your cloud functions in Particle Cloud has to be given a unique name (up to 12 characters in length).
If your Photon device app needs to share multiple functions, use a separate Particle.function() statement for each device function being shared.

Modify Device Function

In order to share a custom function in your Photon device app with Particle Cloud, the custom function must be modified to do the following:
  • The custom function must accept a String parameter when the function is called.
  • The custom function must return an integer value when the function is performed.
For example, a typical custom function in your device app would have this generic format:
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void deviceFunc() {
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// code statements to be performed by function
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}
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The code for this custom function would need to be modified to accept a String parameter (i.e., text) and return an integer value (i.e., whole number). Here's a modified version of the function:
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int deviceFunc(String data) {
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// code statements to be performed by function
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return 1;
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}
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Here are the 3 modifications that were made to the custom function:
  1. 1.
    String data is listed inside the parentheses after the function name. This represents the parameter that the function will accept: String is the data type for the parameter (i.e., text) , and data is the name of a local variable that will receive and store the parameter value (text string). If desired, you could use a different variable name other than data.
  2. 2.
    int is listed in front of the function name (instead of void), which indicates the function will return an integer value (whole number).
  3. 3.
    The code statement return 1; is included inside the function (at the end before the closing curly brace), which will return an integer value of 1. This is the simplest way to have the function return a value.
IMPORTANT: Your custom function must have these modifications – even if your custom function doesn't do anything with the text passed into the data parameter – and even if your device app doesn't do anything with the integer value returned by the custom function.

Calling Device Function

Once a custom function in your Photon device app has been modified to be shared through Particle Cloud, your Photon app (and your web app) must include a text parameter when calling the function.
If the custom function doesn't actually do anything with the parameter, then this text string parameter can be any text – even an empty text string of "" will work.
For example, in your Photon app, a code statement to call the custom function would be:
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deviceFunc("text");
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  • deviceFunction represents the name of the custom function. Change this to the name of your custom function.
  • "text" represents the text string being passed into the function as a parameter. If this text parameter isn't actually used within the function, then it can be any text string enclosed within double quotation marks – even an empty text string of "" will work.

Using String Parameter

As stated previously, the Photon device function being shared through Particle Cloud must accept a String parameter. The function doesn't actually have to do anything with this text data (other than receive it when the function is called).
However, depending on what your custom function does, the text string passed into the data parameter could be used to decide what action(s) are performed within the custom function.
For example, imagine you created a custom function named turnLight() to turn an LED light either on or off based on the value of a text string passed into the function as a parameter:
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int turnLight(String data) {
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if(data == "on")
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digitalWrite(LED, HIGH);
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}
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else if(data == "off") {
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digitalWrite(LED, LOW);
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}
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return 1;
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}
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To turn on the LED, your Photon app (or your web app) would call turnLight() and include"on" as the parameter. In your Photon app, the code statement would be: turnLight("on");
To turn off the LED, your Photon app (or your web app) would call turnLight() function and include "off" as the parameter. In your Photon app, the code statement would be: turnLight("off");

Web App JS

Your web app JS will use the particle.callFunction() method to make a custom function run on your Photon device by calling its cloud function reference in Particle Cloud.
Add this code (be sure to modify) in your web app JS:
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function webFunction() {
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particle.callFunction({ deviceId: myDevice, name: "cloudFunc", argument: "text", auth: myToken });
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}
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MODIFY CODE: You will need to make these changes to the example code above:
  1. 1.
    Change webFunction() to the name you want to use for your custom function
  2. 2.
    Change "cloudFunc" to the name of your cloud function you want to call
  3. 3.
    If necessary, change "text" to a different text parameter – only necessary if your Photon device function uses the text parameter to decide what actions are performed.
This code adds a custom function named webFunction() to your web app JS. This custom function contains the particle.callFunction() method.
Be sure to change webFunction() to the actual name that you want to use for this JS function. If helpful, you could use the same name as the Photon device function being called. For example, if the JS function is supposed to call a function named toggleLight() in your Photon device app, you could also name the JS function as toggleLight().
The particle.callFunction() method requires your Photon device ID, the name of your cloud function, an argument (a String parameter for the Photon function), and your Photon access token:
  1. 1.
    myDevice is a global variable in your web app JS that should store your Photon device ID
  2. 2.
    "cloudFunc" is the name of your cloud function, which must be listed inside double quotation marks. Be sure to change "cloudFunc" to the actual name of your cloud function.
  3. 3.
    "text" is the String parameter that will be passed into the Photon device function. If this text parameter isn't actually used within the Photon function, then it can be any text string enclosed within double quotation marks – even an empty text string of "" will work.
  4. 4.
    myToken is a global variable in your web app JS that should store your Photon access token

Calling JS Function

Your web app will need a way to call the JS function which contains the particle.callFunction() method that makes a function run on your Photon device.
One common way to do this is to add a button in your web app HTML that can be clicked by the user. The button should have an onclick event attribute that will call the JS function (which will in turn call your Photon function).
Add this to your web app HTML file within the <body> section where you want the button to appear:
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<button onclick="webFunction()">Button Label</button>
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  • Change webFunction() to the name of the JS function to be called when the button is clicked. This should be a JS function that contains a particle.callFunction() method.
  • Change Button Label to whatever text you want displayed in the button as its label. Be sure to use a label that will make sense to the user.
NOTE: You could use a different HTML element other than a button. Just be sure it will be clear to the user that the element is "clickable" (and it's clear what will happen when it is clicked).
Last modified 3yr ago